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LLB Honours Law with Criminology

LLB Honours Law with Criminology

Learn about the course below
Start
September
Duration
3 Years
Attendance
Full Time
Fees (Total)
167,100
Annual Breakdown
Year 1 - 55,700 Year 2 - 55,700 Year 3 - 55,700

Why study law with criminology with us

Our LLB Honours Law with Criminology lets you study two complementary perspectives while you gain the initial academic skills to become a qualified solicitor or barrister in England and Wales.

Middlesex University is internationally known for both our law and criminology expertise – and our law with criminology course puts students at the heart of legal innovation.

The degree is recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board and our course provides you with the intellectual knowledge and transferable skills that correspond to the first stage of professional legal education.

You will learn the core principles of law in England and Wales while you will develop your understanding of criminology and the complexities this presents. You will also put theory into practice with work-based modules that will help you develop the hands-on skills and expertise to compete in both the criminal justice system and the legal profession.

  • The LLB degrees offered at Middlesex University Dubai are the only face to face UK qualifying law degrees in the region
  • All our LLB programme are accredited by the bodies regulating the legal profession in the UK 
  • Opportunities to interact and network with distinguished legal practitioners
  • Faculty with extensive experience and expertise in legal research, teaching and practice
  • Opportunities to participate in international mooting and MUN competitions
  • Opportunities to participate in field visits to international organisations
  • Gain exposure to legal practice through the Department’s extensive network of partnerships

What will you study on the LLB Honours Law with Criminology?

In Year 1, you will study the English Legal System, Legal Method, Public Law and Contract Law. In Year 2 you will explore Criminal Law, Tort, EU Law, Victimology and Contemporary Criminological Theory. In Year 3 you are required to study Land Law and Equity and Trusts, in addition to two optional modules.

You will develop your knowledge and understanding, and cognitive and practical skills, through lectures, seminars, workshops and self-directed study using a variety of resources, including the library and e-learning.

What will you gain?

You will develop your knowledge and understanding of primary sources of law such as case law, legislation and other relevant material including examination of how the laws are made and developed, of the institutions within which the law is administered and the personnel who practise law. You will explore a wide range of legal concepts, values, principles and rules, as well as the complexities of law and criminology.

Your cognitive and practical skills will also be expanded and you'll gain the ability to identify accurately and analyse legal issues by applying knowledge of legal principles and concepts to complex practical situations and make reasoned judgements based on informed understanding of arguments. You will be able to research and interpret the primary and secondary source material of law and apply the findings to the solution of legal problems, and then evaluate and judge the value of relevant doctrinal and policy issues in relation to law, criminology and a range of legal topics. You will gain confidence in undertaking independent research and identifying, retrieving, investigating and managing information from a range of academic sources, both paper and electronic to produce up-to-date and relevant information. Finally, you will be able to use and apply correct and accurate legal terminology orally in moots and presentations and in writing.

Please refer to our Academic Calendar for further information: http://www.mdx.ac.ae/life-at-university/academic-calendar

Module and programme information is indicative and may be subject to change.

Note: Both core and optional modules are constantly updated and under review. As with most academic programmes, please remember that it is possible that a module may not be offered in any particular year, for instance because too few students opt for it. Middlesex University reserves the right to vary or withdraw any course or module.

This programme is offered on 'subject to validation' basis. This means that the course information is in the final stages of approval. 

At Middlesex, we regularly add new porgrammes like this one, to our portfolio through a rigourous process called 'validation'. We want to ensure that our future students do not miss the opportunity to take these latest courses, so we aim to publish  the programme information as soon as possible.

'Subject to validation' means that the final course details may change. These changes will be updated prior to the start of your course. If you need more advice or information about these details, please contact our Admissions Office.

  • Year 1

    • Public Law (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      Module aims: To examine general principles relating to the UK Constitution and the organisation and powers of the State; To provide student awareness of the law and practice relating to the control of the Administration of the UK State; To consider the law relating to Human Rights and aspects of Civil Liberties in the UK.
    • Legal Method (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      This module aims to broaden and expand students understanding of the common law system, legal reasoning, case analysis, the judicial hierarchy, handling precedents and statutory interpretation. After studying this module, students will comprehend the basic principles and debates underpinning the position of the courts in the UK constitution; appreciate how to read a case and be able to pick out its material facts and ratio, as well as distinguish this from obiter dicta and develop an understanding of the different rules and approaches that courts use to interpret statutes. The module will also provide the students with a grounding in legal ethics so as to instill a basic understanding of a lawyer s duties toward their clients and the court.
    • English Legal System (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      Module aims: to enable the student to develop an understanding of the English legal system and how it works in order to provide a foundation for the further study of law; to examine the nature and function of legal institutions and the role of the legal profession within the English legal system and explore the provision of legal services and methods of alternative dispute resolution. Students will become familiar with, and be able to use, legal skills and knowledge in respect of issues and problems involving the English legal system.
    • Contract Law (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      The module aims to provide students with a sound knowledge and understanding of the law of contract, focusing on the main principles, cases and statutory provisions relevant to contract law. This will act as a firm foundation for subsequent law modules as well as for postgraduate and professional study after the programme. The module also aims to develop students competence in the analysis and solution of legal problems, to develop their legal research skills and to recognise the relationship between the law of contract and other areas of English and European law.
  • Year 2

    • Contemporary Criminological Theory (15 Credits) - Compulsory

      This module will allow you to engage with recent theoretical developments and trends influencing criminological discussion, debate and research. These developments and trends are assessed in relation to emerging social, political and cultural patterns. Building on prior learning in Year 1, you'll be able to apply theoretical knowledge to a range of contemporary issues and trends of prominent criminological interest and concern.

    • Victimology (15 Credits) - Compulsory

      The module will expand your thinking around victimisation and consider this topic from a broader perspective, assessing societal responses to victimisation and who we consider to be a victim. You'll explore multiple crime types, and you'll compare and contrast different theories and perspectives in relation to the concept of victimisation.

    • Criminal Law (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      The module enables students to acquire a sound knowledge and understanding of criminal law, including a detailed knowledge of the key principles, cases and statutory provisions relevant to criminal law. Students will develop skills in the analysis and solution of legal problems and in researching case law and statute law in relation to criminal law, while recognising the relations between criminal law and other areas of law.
    • Tort (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      This module aims to provide a general knowledge and understanding of tort law and lay a sound foundation upon which to develop knowledge, skills and competencies needed for the Vocational Stage of legal education and training, and subsequent careers in legal practice or higher qualifications in law. The study of case law will develop skills in extracting and communicating the meaning of written reports. Students will be challenged to achieve a higher level of understanding and application of the law in practice and attention will be given to the ethical issues that can arise.
    • EU Law (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the legal system of the European Union EU and of the rules governing the free movement of goods, persons, services and capital within the EU s internal market; to apply knowledge of EU law to the analysis of legal issues and to develop the student s skills of information retrieval from a range of sources, in accordance with the requirements of the Joint Academic Stage Board for the Foundations of Legal Knowledge. The module includes the study of the history and development of the EU, the EU s institutional framework, sources of EU law and law-making procedures, the main substantive principles underlying EU Law and the relationship between EU law and national law. An exhaustive overview of the jurisdiction of the EU courts will also be offered. The key principles governing the free movement of goods, persons and services and capital will also be covered.
  • Year 3

    • Land Law (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      Module aims: to provide a critical understanding of the law in the context of dealings in land. The course builds upon students knowledge of legal principles by bringing these together with rules of land law. Students ability to evaluate issues, including ethical issues, and to solve land law problems at a high level of understanding is enhanced, together with their personal and professional development and employability skills. This is a core module and is a requirement of the professional bodies.
    • Equity and Trusts (30 Credits) - Compulsory
      This module is a core module and is a requirement of the professional bodies. It builds upon students knowledge of legal principles by bringing these together with rules of trust law and principles of equity, including the ethical principles which govern the role of a trustee as fiduciary and principles relevant to the quantification of damages and availability of assets for their recovery. Students critical understanding of the law of trusts and equitable principles, ability to present and argue positions in relation to issues of equity and trust law, to analyse practical problems accurately and to debate issues at a high level of understanding is developed.
    • Contemporary Issues in Criminology and Policy Processes (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module gives you the unique experience of studying alongside people accommodated in prison. You'll use the criminal justice system as a point of reference to examine contemporary issues and debates relating to crime control and theories of punishment, in which ideas of rehabilitation, system reform, and social justice are embedded.

    • Transnational Crime (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module explores and critiques the globalisation of crime and the extent to which a ‘globalised’ response to transnational crime exists. You'll discuss, evaluate, engage and critically analyse various topics including corruption (corporate and public), democracy, legitimacy, the drugs trade, arms trade, and smuggling and trafficking in humans and body parts.

    • Children as Victims and the Child Protection System (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module will allow you to examine the relevant theories, literature and public discourses surrounding the concept of children as victims and the child protection system. You'll learn about the range of challenges surrounding child protection, including situations leading to failures in multi-agency approaches, child safety and protection strategies.

    • Cyber-Security (15 Credits) - Optional

      The module will give you an in-depth approach to cybercrime challenges from a criminological cyber-security perspective. You'll be introduced to specific cybercrime methods, pathways and platforms as well as cyber-security responses in relation to financial, personal and political cybercrime.

    • Drugs, Crime and Criminal Justice (15 Credits) - Optional
      This module aims to introduce the contemporary debates surrounding drugs, drug use and its control. It will develop your knowledge and understanding of the processes involved in social definitions of drugs and drug users and your skills in applying criminological theories to drug issues. It aims to facilitate critical analysis and evaluation of the laws, policies and institutions of drugs control and their social, economic and political contexts. The module also aims to foster and develop your critical interest in the reform of drugs control policy.
    • Forensic Mental Health and Offending (15 Credits) - Optional
      Are mentally disordered offenders ‘mad’ or ‘bad’? Should they be ‘treated’ or ‘punished’? What is the relationship between ‘mental health’ and ‘offending’? These are just some of many questions in this exciting new module which aims to introduce you to these key debates as well as exploring key theories and the differing responses surrounding forensic mental health. You will begin by looking at the different ways in which mental health has been classified, understood and responded to – tracing the history of asylums and psychiatry through to the de-institutionalisation of the mentally ill and moves towards ‘care in the community’. Public and political responses to high profile cases are considered. You will be able to critically engage with the development of criminal justice and health responses to mentally disordered offenders and consider the theoretical and practical challenges raised by targeting some people as ‘dangerous’ offenders. Treatment and risk predictions are also explored. The module will use case studies including looking at severe personality disorder and drug misuse.
    • ‘Learning Together’ Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module gives you the unique experience of studying alongside people accommodated in prison. You'll use the criminal justice system as a point of reference to examine contemporary issues and debates relating to crime control and theories of punishment, in which ideas of rehabilitation, system reform, and social justice are embedded. 

    • Crimes of the Powerful (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module will facilitate your critical engagement with crimes of the powerful, defined as illegal conducts perpetrated by offenders who hold an exorbitant degree of resources (both material and symbolic) as well as power when compared to those they victimise. The module follows the tradition of study established by Edwin Sutherland. However, the focus moves from the generic interest in white collar crime onto the crimes of the powerful (or power crimes).

    • Violent Crime (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module aims to discuss the dynamics of violence from a gender-informed perspective, how it is used by perpetrators, controlled, and used to control. The module highlights the interconnections between violence and crime, and illustrates the blurred boundaries between interpersonal, self-inflicted, community and structural violence.

    • Investigations in Theory and Practice (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module provides an overview of models of investigation from a theoretical and practical perspective. You'll critically examine existing and evolving legislation, policies, processes and developments in investigative practice. You'll explore the role of investigations as a fact-finding exercise and the search for ‘truth’ within criminal, civil and administrative justice contexts.

    • Rehabilitation and Community Support (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module enables you to evaluate the various interventions used to reform or rehabilitate offenders. You'll critically assess key agencies involved in rehabilitation and punishment, analysing the experiences of those subject to community justice. You'll also learn to critically analyse the various barriers to successful re-entry, desistance and rehabilitation of lawbreakers and the role risk plays in assessing offenders.

    • Comparative Criminal Justice: Courts, Sentencing and Prisons (15 Credits) - Optional

      This module will enable you to undertake comparative criminal justice analysis across jurisdictions. You'll learn how to justify the relevance and importance of the data used in a country (case) study approach. The module takes a comparative approach to understand the similarities and differences in criminal justice systems, penal policy, sentencing approaches and ‘cultures of punishment’ across jurisdictions.

    • Contemporary Criminological Theory (15 Credits) - Optional

You will be actively involved in a range of learning, teaching and assessment approaches as part of your programme. Such participative approaches aim to put you at the centre of your learning so you are involved and engaged in all aspects of your assessment and learning. Your programme will require deep involvement in learning activities and collaboration with your fellow students, working and learning with others as part of small groups. Learning activities may also occur both within and outside the classroom. Workshops are used to enhance a range of skills and focus on specific areas of expertise. Group work and moots (pretend courts) will hone your verbal arguing and presentation skills.

Your learning will also be supported by technology. Increasingly your tutors will be using existing and emerging learning technologies to engage you in e-learning activities. Your programme may be facilitated using a variety of media and online tools (My Learning on UniHub, podcasts, wikis, etc.). By engaging with e-learning you will also be developing skills which are essential for your learning and are also highly valued by employers. These include but are not limited to: working flexibly, communication, understanding of IT, team working and creating shared understandings based on quality resources and access to global expertise.

You will develop your knowledge of all aspects of law and commercial law at lectures, seminars and workshops, and supplement this with your own independent study.

  • Lectures are often interactive, involving exercises and informal assessment by other students, and by you of your own work.
  • Seminars are small group discussions which you will need to prepare for in advance. Here you will learn to analyse legal principles and apply them to practical situations, assess competing arguments and choose between alternative approaches.
  • Group work and moots (pretend courts) will hone your verbal arguing and presentation skills. Personal and career development as well as group work are reinforced through workshops.

The course will also teach you to do legal research, and to review information from academic sources, journals and electronic resources. As you progress, you will have the opportunity to do your own research into an aspect of commercial law which the course has not covered. The course also includes dedicated careers events, and a programme of guest speakers drawn from the legal profession and other careers, as well as extra-curricular student-led activities careers events and talks by guest speakers from the legal profession.

The following international qualifications are normally considered for admission:

Successful completion of the Middlesex University International Foundation Programme (IFP)*** (equivalent programmes from other Universities/Colleges/Institutes will be considered).
Indian Secondary School Certificates issued by the CBSE/ISC boards/NIOS/All State Boards may be considered: minimum grade of 70% overall
Minimum two, maximum three subjects, with grades of B,B,B
You must have passed the full IB Diploma. In some cases applicants will also need to have studied certain subjects at Standard or Higher Level. If you are unsure about the suitability of your qualifications or would like help with your application, please contact admissions@mdx.ac.ae for support.

Students who have completed their GCSEs are eligible to join our International Foundation Programme – a one year programme to prepare students for entry onto our Undergraduate Programmes. Please note that students must meet the British AS and A Level entry requirements in order to gain entry into the First Year of any one of our Undergraduate Programmes.

UAE’s General Secondary Education Certificate Examination Grade 12 (Tawjihiya) plus successful completion of the Middlesex University International Foundation Programme (IFP)*** or equivalent programmes
Completion of Year 1 at a recognised post-secondary institution (university / college). Candidates that have successfully completed FSC/HSC are admitted to the Middlesex University’s International Foundation Programme (IFP)***
Minimum overall grade of 12. Students completing the High School Diploma are admitted to the International Foundation Programme (IFP)***
Candidates are admitted to the International Foundation Programme (IFP)***
National Curriculum of the countries of Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan: Candidates are admitted to the International Foundation Programme (IFP)***
Candidates are admitted to the International Foundation Programme (IFP)***
Students with American High School Diploma are eligible to join our Foundation programme. However, if you have passed the American High School Diploma with the university required GPA and SAT or ACT or AP Scores you may be eligible for direct entry into Year 1 of the undergraduate programme. If you are unsure about the suitability of your qualifications or would like help with your application, please contact admissions@mdx.ac.ae for support.
BTEC Level 3 qualifications***** (suite of qualifications known as Nationals) may be considered for direct entry into an undergraduate programme

***** BTEC qualifications (QCF) (suite of qualifications known as Nationals) are acceptable both on their own and in combination with other qualifications. Applicants are expected to have studied for the Diploma or Extended Diploma. The Certificate, Subsidiary Diploma and 90 Credit Diploma are expected to be studied in combination to equal that of at least the Diploma (for example, the Subsidiary Diploma would need to be offered in combination with either a Diploma or two GCE A levels).

Note: *** International Foundation Programme (IFP) is a one year programme to prepare students for entry to Undergraduate programmes

This list shows only a selection of qualifications. If your high school system does not appear here, please contact our Admissions Office admissions@mdx.ac.ae and we will be able to advise you further.

English Language Requirements (Undergraduate)

All programmes at Middlesex University Dubai are taught in English and applicants with previous education outside of English-speaking countries (such as the UK, the United States, Canada, England, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand), must demonstrate English language proficiency as follows:

English Language Test

Entry Requirement

IELTS Academic

6.0 (minimum 5.5 in each band)

TOEFL Internet-based

72 (17 in listening & writing, 20 in speaking and 18 in reading)

PearsonPTE Academic

51


Additionally, students with the following qualifications may be considered as having met the English language requirements:

English Language

Entry Requirement

GCSE/IGCSE/O-Level English

(as a first or second language)

Grade C or Higher

CBSE/ISC boards/NIOS/All state boards

Minimum grade of 65% in English

International Baccalaureate

Minimum grade 5 in English A1 (Standard or Higher Level) in IB OR a minimum of grade 5 in English B (Higher Level)

West African/Nigerian Curriculum

WAEC/WASSCE/SSSCE 

Minimum grade “C6“

TOEFL-IBT home-based test

 

Accepted for September 2020 only and in territories where standard version of the test is not available due to test centre closure  
UG: 72

Duolingo

Accepted for September 2020 only
UG: Overall 95

 

IELTS Indicator 

Accepted for September 2020 only and test certificate must be dated after 20 May 2020.

Note: this test is accepted only in territories where IELTS test centre is closed.  


For admissions related enquiries, kindly contact our admissions team on 0097143678100 / 0097143751212 alternatively you can email on admissions@mdx.ac.ae

How can the LLB Law with Criminology support your career?

Students who complete the programme are able to compete effectively for jobs in the criminal justice system in the UK and abroad, as well as in legal practice.

As a Qualifying Law Degree, the LLB Law with Criminology satisfies the requirements set by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board for the academic stage of training. Upon successful completion of the LLB, you may pursue the second (or ‘vocational’) stage of professional training via the Legal Practice Course (solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course (barristers).

There are many sectors where a law degree is highly desired, including business (Human Resources, Tax and Insurance), charity, management,administration, the Civil Service, education and government. You might choose to pursue a career as a Solicitor, Barrister, Legal Executive, Paralegal, or in a community advisory role.

You could also choose to continue into further study on courses such as the Legal Practice Course (LPC), the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) or master's programmes in law as well as related subjects.

What support is available?

Our Employability Service will help you to develop skills desired by top employers and gain valuable work experience. We provide workshops,events and one-to-one support with job hunting, writing your CV and cover letters, interview coaching and advice on how to network effectively. We also support you in securing part-time work, placements, internships, and volunteering opportunities, and offer an enterprise support service for those looking to start their own business.

Middlesex Associates FZ LLC, Dubai Knowledge Park - Blocks 4, 16, 17 & 19
Admissions +971 (0)4 3678100

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